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Parents of teen facing serious charges don't show up in court

Parents of teen facing serious charges don't show up in court

TUSLA, the Child and Family Agency, has been asked to attend the hearings of a Dublin youth accused of serious assaults because his parents will not come to court with him.

The 17-year-old boy, who cannot be named because he is a minor, appeared before Judge Brian O’Shea at Dublin Children’s Court on Tuesday.

Tusla was represented at the hearing after the teenager came to his previous hearing without parents, as is required by law in criminal prosecutions against minors.

The youth is faces four charges arising out of an incident in Dublin city-centre on Sept. 9 last year: attempting to commit an offence at Henry Street, assault causing harm to a male at the same location as well as violent disorder and assault causing harm to another male at O’Connell Street.

Tusla was represented at the hearing following a request made by the court when neither of the teen’s parents turned up for the proceedings on an earlier date.

Judge O’Shea heard that the teen’s older brother, an adult, had come to court, however, the boy's mother had not attended and “his father does not generally attend court”.

A number of charges relating to bicycle thefts and failing to turn up to court were adjourned for hearing in mid September.

However, the charges relating to the alleged assaults were put back until the start of next month for a special hearing to determine the youth’s trial venue.

Judge O’Shea heard that the Director of Public Prosecutions has recommended that the youth should face trial on indictment in relation to those matters, meaning that the case could go to the circuit court which has tougher sentencing powers.

He accepted that the boy’s brother could come to court with him on the next date but said he would rather if Tusla was also present for the next hearing.

The youth was remanded on continuing bail.

The teenager had two addresses, the court heard, however he has been ordered to obey a 9pm to 9am curfew at one of them and he has to provide mobile phone number on which he can be contacted at all times.