How Irish Harry Potter star magically made his fortune disappear

CourtsBy Eugene Masterson
Devon Murray arriving at court last week
Devon Murray arriving at court last week

IRISH Harry Potter star Devon Murray's mother Fidelma claims her party-lov­ing son blew over €1.2million on "drinking, girls and cars".

Devon (27), went out on boozing sessions with Jonathan Ross and gallivanted with mates including 'Damo and Ivor' star Andy Quirke.

Devon claims that he also spent it on horses and property, "but the arse fell out of that".

The actor, who played the role of Seamus Finnigan in the Harry Potter movie series, was sued by his ex-agent Nigel Brooks for €286,000 in unpaid commission fees.

A judge on Friday declared that Devon must pay Brooks €260,000.

The Murrays, from Celbridge, Co. Kildare, claim they sacked Brooks when Devon was working on the third Harry Potter film, following an incident in which the boy, who was 13 at the time, was photographed smoking a cigarette on the London set.

Brooks claimed the incident was the re­sponsibility of his guardian.

He also said he signed an agreement in 2003 with the Mur­rays for an increase in fees for his role in the four films Devon took part in, from 12.5 per cent per film to 15 per cent, resulting in a total of €286,000.

Asked by High Court judge Michael Moriarty where all Devon's money had gone, Fidelma replied that he had "gone drinking, taken out girls and bought cars because that is what teenage boys do."

When the smoking inci­dent occurred and studio executives at Warner Brothers complained, both he and his moth­er rang Brooks telling him he was fired.

Devon told the court: "I thought an agent was going to magically make this [adverse publicity] disappear, but I was wrong."

The Murrays had denied owing him the money and coun­ter-claimed for €98,000 they said they had already paid him.

But after the case on Friday, only Devon denied his mother's claims.

"It wasn't all women, cars and drink," he said.

He said he was "a completely naive child" when he entered the agreement with Brooks, but added he would never trade his involvement in Harry Potter for the world.

He has found it very hard to get work since and he believes it may be due to the dispute with his former agent.

Mr Justice Moriarty said in making the award against Devon, and against his parents Fidelma and Michael, that he was sorry that things did not work out for the young actor, who made "a million or more which went on proceeds which were not very helpful."

Devon's mother said she was disap­pointed with the judge's decision and while they would try to pay the money, she did not know how they would.

She also said she did not see how an agreement lasting one year could stretch into 10 years.

Devon this week declared on Facebook: "I always thought a legal battle was meant to be fought in a courtroom, not in the media.

"Once the hearing is over, no matter the outcome, I will tell people my side of the story. Until then I think it should stay in the courtroom.

"It's not the media I blame at all. They all have a job to do. It's the plaintiff and his team I have the problem with."