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Sly and the Family Stone co-founder Cynthia Robinson dies

MusicBy Sunday World
Sly and the Family Stone co-founder Cynthia Robinson dies

Sly and the Family Stone co-founder Cynthia Robinson has died aged 69.

The trumpet player-and-vocalist for the pivotal funk and soul group passed away on Monday (23.11.15) from cancer, according to the band's publicist who confirmed the news on Tuesday (24.11.15).

In a statement released on her passing fans were asked to donate money to the Cynthia Robinson Cancer Care Fund set up in her memory.

A statement on the band's Facebook page read: "Friends, Family and Fans throughout the world, Cynthia Robinson, Trumpeter and Co- Founder of Sly and The Family Stone has passed.

"Our condolences go out to the Robinson Family and her bandmates and all family & friends. You are in our thoughts and prayers and we are here for you. Please continue to support the Cynthia Robinson Cancer Care Fund due to the rising medical costs ( anything helps). This site will stay up in her memory. God bless you Cynthia! (sic)"

The 'Dance To The Music' hitmaker was among the first black and female trumpet players to be in a major American band in the 60s and the first to be enlisted into Hollywood's Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

The gifted brass star was also the original band member of Family Stone who worked with lead singer Sly Stone after the band fell broke up in 1975.

Cynthia and her bandmates - Sylvester 'Sly Stone' Stewart, his brother Freddie and sister Rose, Robinson, Larry Graham, Greg Errico and Jerry Martini - dominated pop music in the 60s and 70s and had a string of number one hits including the classic 'Dance To The Music'.

Saxophonist Jerry Martini has paid tribute to his late bandmate calling her an strong leading musician.

He told Billboard: "She covered a lot of ground. She was the first female trumpet player and the first African-American trumpet player in Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. She wasn't in the back. She was out front telling you to get up and dance to the music, and she could blow with the best of 'em, always."